Logos Workshop

Logos Shell

For information about past Logos Workshops, please visit their webpages on the left. Questions? Email us!

The annual Logos Workshop fosters important collaborative interaction between analytic philosophers and theologians on topics of common interest. Numerous ongoing and intellectually productive friendships have been forged as a result of this conference series. Registration for the conference is open to anyone who would like to attend. Online registration will be open in January.

Logos 2020 will be held at the University of Notre Dame on May 28-30, and will be the final, large scale workshop in this series at Notre Dame. We have run this conference since 2009, and it has been an important event in the life of our Center. Nevertheless, we feel that the time has come to draw it to a close. It has been an immensely rewarding experience, and we are thankful that we have been able to host it for so many years. We hope that the research and relationships cultivated and deepened at Logos will continue to grow even as our workshop comes to an end.

Narrative, Personhood, and the Self

Issues concerning “the self”—its nature, our knowledge of it, mechanisms for transforming it, and much else besides—are historically central and currently active areas of research in philosophy, theology, and psychology.  An increasingly important idea in all three disciplines is the view that narrative is somehow essential to the self and intimately connected with key aspects of the life and development of a person. Narrative, or the activity of constructing narratives, has been credited with all manner of different roles in our lives, from contributing to positive outcomes in the wake of trauma, to helping us make sense of and find meaning in our own actions and other events that make up our lives, to unifying our consciousness and explaining important aspects of our agency, to constituting us as persons. The 2020 Logos Workshop will bring together philosophers, biblical scholars, and theologians to discuss these and related issues about personhood, the self, and the role narrative might play in the construction and transformation of the self.