Boards and Faculty

For more than 30 years, the University of Notre Dame has been one of the best places in the world to conduct research in the philosophy of religion. Below are profiles of Notre Dame faculty members who have published extensively in philosophy of religion (or who have serious research interests in that subject) and who have participated, to varying degrees, in the activities of the Center.

Executive and Advisory Boards

Overseeing the numerous activities of the Center for Philosophy of Religion are the co-directors of the Center. The current co-directors are Michael C. Rea, Professor of Philosophy at Notre Dame (Director), and Samuel Newlands, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Notre Dame (Director of Research).

The Director and Director of Research are aided by an Executive Board, which consists of members of Notre Dame's Department of Philosophy who specialize in the philosophy of religion. Robert Audi, Richard Cross, Thomas P. Flint, Alvin Plantinga, Meghan Sullivan, Peter van Inwagen, and Ted Warfield are current members of the Executive Board.

In addition, an Advisory Board of distinguished philosophers from outside Notre Dame assists the director. Current members of the Advisory Board are Michael Bergmann (Purdue University), Jeffrey Brower (Purdue University), Susan Brower-Toland (St. Louis University), Andrew Chignell (Cornell University), Oliver Crisp (University of Bristol), Mark Murphy (Georgetown University), Eleonore Stump (St. Louis University), and Dean Zimmerman (Rutgers University).

Faculty Profiles

Robert Audi

Robert Audi

The John A. O'Brien Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., University of Michigan), whose interests extend to epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, philosophy of action, and philosophy of religion, Audi is the author of numerous articles and books, the most recent of which include The Good in the Right: a Theory of Intuition and Intrinsic Value (2004), Moral Value and Human Diversity (2008), Business Ethics and Ethical Business (2009), and Epistemology: a Contemporary Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge, 3rd ed. (2010); he is currently writing a book on the epistemology of religious belief. He is past president of the Society of Christian Philosophers and the Central Division of the American Philosophical Association.

Richard Cross

Richard Cross

The Reverend John A. O'Brien Professor of Philosophy (D.Phil., Oxford University), whose research specializations include mediæval philosophy and theology, and the history of philosophy, Cross has published widely in these areas, including his books Duns Scotus (1999), The Metaphysics of Incarnation (2002), and Duns Scotus on God (2005). He is currently the chair of the Department of Philosophy at Notre Dame.
 

Thomas P. Flint

Thomas P. Flint

Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., University of Notre Dame) and former director of the Center for Philosophy of Religion, Flint was a Harper Fellow in the Humanities at the University of Chicago prior to returning to Notre Dame. Flint's primary research and teaching interests are in philosophical theology, philosophy of religion, metaphysics, the history of political theory, and Greek drama. His published work centers mainly on divine and human freedom (especially on questions concerning divine providence and the Incarnation). He edited Christian Philosophy (1990) and co-edited, with Eleonore Stump, Hermes and Athena: Biblical Exegesis and Philosophical Theology (1993). His published work includes Divine Providence: The Molinist Account (1998). Recent articles include "A New Anti-Anti-Molinist Argument?" (1999), "A Death He Freely Accepted: Molinist Reflections on the Incarnation" (2001), "The Possibilities of Incarnation: Some Radical Molinist Suggestions" (2001), "The Multiple Muddles of Maverick Molinism" (2002), "Risky Business: Open Theism and the Incarnation" (2004), and "The Basket That Never Was" (2008). He is currently editor of the journal Faith and Philosophy.

Alfred J. Freddoso

Alfred J. Freddoso

The John and Jean Oesterle Professor of Thomistic Studies (Ph.D., University of Notre Dame), Freddoso was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Brown University from 1977 to 1979. His main interests are in metaphysics, mediæval philosophy, and philosophical theology. He has translated many important works from mediæval philosophy, including Part II of William of Ockham's Summa Logicae (1980), Part IV, "On Divine Foreknowledge" from Luis de Molina's Concordia, along with an introduction (1988), and William of Ockham's Quodlibetal Questions (1991). He also edited The Existence and Nature of God (1983). Recent papers include "Human Nature, Potency and the Incarnation" (1985), "The Necessity of Nature" (1986), "Medieval Aristotelianism and the Case Against Secondary Causation in Nature" (1988), and "Ontological Reductionism and Faith versus Reason: A Critique of Adams on Ockham" (1991). He is currently working on a translation of Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica.

Gary Gutting

Gary Gutting

The Notre Dame Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., St. Louis University), Gutting received a postdoctoral Fulbright Grant to Louvain (1968-1969) and is primarily interested in philosophy of science, philosophy of religion, metaphilosophy, and contemporary French philosophy. He is the co-author of The Synoptic Vision: The Philosophy of Wilfrid Sellars (1977), editor of Paradigms and Revolutions: Applications and Appraisals of Thomas Kuhn's Philosophy of Science (1980), editor of Religious Belief and Religious Skepticism (1982), co-editor of Science and Reality: Essays in Honor of Ernan McMullin (1984), co-editor of Michel Foucault's Archaeology of Scientific Reason (1989), editor of The Cambridge Companion to Foucault (1994), and  editor of Pragmatic Liberalism and the Critique of Modernity (1998). Gutting's recent articles include "Continental Approaches to History and Philosophy of Science" (1989), "Gaston Bachelard's Philosophy of Science" (1987), "Foucault's Genealogical Method"(1990), and "Plantinga and the Rationality of Religious Belief" (1995). He is the founder and co-editor of Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.

Samuel Newlands

Samuel Newlands

Director of Research of the Center for Philosophy of Religion and Associate Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., Yale University), Newlands' areas of interest include early modern philosophy, metaphysics, and philosophy of religion. He recently received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities to work on a monograph entitled Reconceiving Spinoza. Recent articles include "Another Kind of Spinozistic Monism" (2010), "The Harmony of Spinoza and Leibniz" (2010), "The Problem of Evil" (forthcoming), "Spinoza's Relevance for Contemporary Metaphysics and Philosophy of Mind" (forthcoming), and "Spinoza's Modal Metaphysics." He is also the co-editor of Metaphysics and the Good: Themes from the Philosophy of Robert Merrihew Adams (with Larry Jorgensen, 2009).

John O'Callaghan

John O Callaghan

Associate Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., University of Notre Dame),whose areas of interest include mediæval philosophy, Thomas Aquinas, and Thomistic metaphysics, O'Callaghan is co-editor of Recovering Nature: Essays in Honor of Ralph McInerny (1999). Recent published work includes Thomistic Realism and The Linguistic Turn: Toward a More Perfect Form of Existence (2003), "Neither Robber Barons nor Philosopher Kings: Political Prudence in the Just Polity According to Plato, Aristotle, and Aquinas" (2008), and "The Unity of Nature Now and Then: Aquinas and Hilary Putnam" (2008).

Michael C. Rea

Michael Rea

Director of the Center for Philosophy of Religion and Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., University of Notre Dame), whose areas of interest include metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of religion, and philosophical theology, Rea has edited Material Constitution: A Reader (1997) and Oxford Readings in Philosophical Theology (2009). He has co-edited Analytic Theology: New Essays in Philosophical Theology (with Oliver Crisp, 2009) and The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology (with Thomas P. Flint, 2009). His published work includes "The Puzzle of Material Constitution" (1995), "Temporal Parts Unmotivated" (1998), "How to Be an Eleatic Monist" (2000), "What Is Pornography?" (2001), World without Design: the Ontological Consequences of Naturalism (2002), and "Material Constitution and the Trinity" (with Jeffrey Brower, 2005).

Peter van Inwagen

Peter van Inwagen

John Cardinal O'Hara Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., University of Rochester), whose area of interests include metaphysics, philosophy of action, and philosophical theology, van Inwagen is the author of numerous articles and books, including An Essay on Free Will (1983); Material Beings (1990); God, Knowledge and Mystery: Essays in Philosophical Theology (1995); The Possibility of Resurrection and Other Essays in Christian Apologetics (1998); Ontology, Identity, and Modality (2002); The Problem of Evil (2006); and Metaphysics, 3rd ed. (2008). He co-edited Persons: Human and Divine (with Dean Zimmerman, 2007). Van Inwagen is past president of the Central Division of the APA and the Society of Christian Philosophers.

Ted A. Warfield

Ted A. Warfield

Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., Rutgers University), Warfield's philosophical interests range widely across analytic philosophy to include epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, philosophy of religion, and applied ethics. He has co-edited Mental Representation: a Reader (with Stephen Stich, 1994), Skepticism: a Contemporary Reader (with Keith DeRose, 1999), The Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Mind (with Stephen Stich, 2003), and Disagreement (with Richard Feldman, 2010). His recent published work includes "Divine Foreknowledge and Human Freedom are Compatible" (1997), "Causal Determinism and Human Freedom are Incompatible" (2000), "When Epistemic Closure Does and Does Not Fail: a Lesson From the History of Epistemology" (2004), "Knowledge From Falsehood" (2005), and "Knowledge-Closure and Skepticism" (with Marian David, 2008). He is working on monographs on skeptical arguments and the metaphysics of freedom.

Emeriti Faculty Profiles

David Burrell, C.S.C.

David Burrell

Emeritus Professor (Ph.D., Yale University; S.T.L., Gregorian University in Rome) and past Theodore M. Hesburgh Professor in Philosophy and Theology, Burrell has worked since 1982 in comparative issues in philosophical theology in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. His published works include the books Knowing the Unknowable God: Ibn-Sina, Maimonides, Aquinas (1986); Freedom and Creation in Three Traditions (1993); "Friendship and Ways to Truth" (Notre Dame, 2000); and two translations of Al-Ghazali: Al-Ghazali on the Ninety-Nine Beautiful Names of God (1993) and Al-Ghazali on Faith in Divine Unity and Trust in Divine Providence (Book 35 of his Ihya Ulum ad-Din) (2001).

Michael J. Loux

Michael Loux

Emeritus Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., University of Chicago), past George Shuster Professor of Philosophy, and past dean of the College of Arts and Letter, Loux's interests include Greek philosophy (especially Aristotle) and metaphysics. He has authored numerous influential works in metaphysics and Greek philosophy, including Substance and Attribute (1978), Primary Ousia: An Essay on Aristotle's Metaphysics Ζ and Η (1991), Metaphysics: a Contemporary Introduction, 3rd ed. (2006), and "Aristotle's Constituent Ontology" (2006). He has edited Universals and Particulars (1970), The Possible and the Actual (1990), and The Oxford Handbook of Metaphysics (with Dean Zimmerman, 2003).

Alvin Plantinga

Alvin Plantinga

Emeritus Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., Yale University), past Reverend John A. O'Brien Professor of Philosophy, and past director of the Center for Philosophy of Religion, Plantinga works in metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of religion, and philosophical theology. He has written numerous influential books and articles, including God and Other Minds (1967), The Nature of Necessity (1974), God, Freedom and Evil (1974), Does God Have a Nature? (1980), Warrant: The Current Debate (1993), Warrant and Proper Function (1993), Warranted Christian Belief (2000), Knowledge of God (with Michael Tooley, 2009), and a set of Gifford Lectures entitled Science and Religion: Conflict or Concord (forthcoming). Plantinga is past president of the Society of Christian Philosophers and the Central Division of the APA.

Funding

Funding for the Center has been generously provided by the University of Notre Dame and by grants from the J. Howard Pew Freedom Trust and from the De Rance Foundation.